Blades of glory

[Recipe 1] BLADE BEEF POT ROAST with SHIITAKE MUSHROOM GRAVY and BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH TOASTED WALNUTS transforms into
[Recipe 2] ASIAN-STYLE TACOS with BLADE BEEF, KIMCHI COLESLAW and SRIRACHA MAYO

There were moans at the dinner table. Not whiney ones, I mean the ‘Can’t talk, eating’ pleasure-induced type. I’ve gotta say these are two of the tastiest meals I’ve served in ages!
The inspiration for this post began with a dish the husband and I devoured recently at one of our favourite locals, The More the Better – perfectly unctuous pork belly strips, rolled up in large gossamer-thin slices of vinegary pickled daikon (Chinese white radish). The stand-out component for me though was the kimchi-style coleslaw dotted on top. Traditional Korean kimchi is made from fermented cabbage and other veggies, but The More the Better served theirs raw, so it retained a satisfying crunch. Man it was good.
I immediately set about creating my own version of kimchi slaw. We are a family of slaw hooverers, often eating it once a week in wraps with fish or lamb. Mine is usually a mostly-mayo concoction with a dash of apple cider vinegar, but elevating the vinegar to hero status is a taste sensation. Instead of mandolining a daikon to use for wrapping (too fiddly), I grated it and added it to the slaw for an extra kick of tartness. YUM!
Although we do love our pork belly, I served the kimchi slaw with strips of tender roast blade beef, rolled up like soft tacos in Chinese pancakes, with a squirt of creamy sriracha mayo to balance out the vinegared slaw.
As this blog is all about creating two meals from one, we enjoyed my slightly Asian-style blade beef pot roast on the first night, reserving a couple of cups of the juicy beef for the Chinese pancakes. This pot roast is the perfect Winter pig-out, drizzled with shiitake mushroom gravy (which just happens to be gluten-free) and served with confit-style baked spuds and super-tasty Brussels sprouts scattered with toasted walnuts for texture.
Two meals from one, too easy, and either meal would be perfect to dish up for Fathers Day next weekend. xx

Brussels sprouts with toasted walnuts. One Equals Two.Blade beef pot roast with shiitake mushroom gravy. One Equals Two.[Recipe 1] Blade beef pot roast with shiitake mushroom gravy and Brussels sprouts with toasted walnuts

Ingredients (beef serves 4 for two meals):
2 tablespoons olive oil
1.75 kilo (3.8 lb) blade (bolar) beef
2 cups good-quality beef stock
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese five spice powder
2 small brown onions, peeled and sliced
4 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
4 large potatoes, cut into wedges
Brussels sprouts with toasted walnuts to serve
For the shiitake mushroom gravy:
40g (1½ oz) dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked for 30 minutes in 2 cups boiling water, drained (¼ cup soaking liquid reserved)
Salt and freshly-cracked black pepper

Preheat oven to 150°C (300ºF).
Heat olive oil in a heavy-based frying pan. Add the beef and cook over medium–high heat, turning occasionally, until well-browned all over, for about 8 minutes. Transfer to a small, close-fitting, lidded ovenproof pot, preferably cast iron.
Mix stock, soy sauce and Chinese five spice powder together and pour into the frying pan. Simmer gently for 2 minutes, scraping up all the brown bits from the bottom. Pour over the beef. Scatter the onion and garlic slices around the beef.
Place into the pre-heated oven and roast, tightly covered, for 1½ hours at which point the beef should be turned and ladled with pan juices.
Remove 1½ cups of the pan juices and pour into a small baking dish (I use a loaf-sized cake pan). Add the potato wedges, toss, cover tightly with foil, and place in the oven next to the beef. The potato pieces will deliciously poach confit-style in the beef juices for crisping later!
Bake beef and potatoes for a further 1½ hours, turning the potatoes once, after 45 minutes.
Total beef cooking time is 3 hours. Test to see whether beef is fork tender – if not, return to the oven for a further 30 minutes and check again.
Take the beef from the pan, place onto a board and rest, covered with foil, for 20 minutes.
Remove the potato chunks from the pan with tongs or a slotted spoon, and transfer to a tray lined with baking paper. Turn the oven up to 250°C (480ºF), and return potatoes to the oven for 25–30 minutes for crisping, while you prepare the gravy and slice the beef. Potatoes can be kept warm in a low oven.
For the gravy: ladle 1½ cups of the beef cooking juices from the pan, skim off the fat and pour into a small saucepan. Add a few tablespoons of the roasted onion and garlic slices, the soaked shiitake mushrooms and the reserved ¼ cup mushroom soaking liquid. Simmer for 5 minutes, until reduced. Season to taste. Puree in a blender until very smooth. Add a splash more stock or pan juices if it is too thick. Transfer to a small small warmed jug.
When ready to serve, slice the beef.
♦ Reserve half the sliced beef (approx. 2 cups/450g/1 lb), and ¼ cup of the cooking juices, for the Asian-style tacos (see recipe 2).
Drizzle the remaining sliced beef with pan juices. Serve with the roasted spuds, shiitake mushroom gravy and Brussels sprouts with toasted walnuts.

  • A pot roast must be cooked in a tightly-sealed pot! Like brisket, blade beef is best suited to wet roasting. Blade is a cheap cut and if not cooked properly can be as tough as an old boot! The key to beautiful, meltingly tender meat is lots of moisture and a long cooking time on a low heat. The beef should be fairly snug, with liquid at least half-way up the meat. I use a 4 litre (8½ pint) capacity cast iron lidded casserole pot. If yours is bigger, add a splash more stock.
  • Reserved roasted beef blade can be stored in the fridge, well-covered, for up to 3 days.
  • Leftover shiitake mushroom gravy can be refrigerated for up to 3 days; or frozen for up to 3 months. Defrost overnight in the fridge. Warm, stirring, in a small saucepan. It’s delicious drizzled over steak!
  • Kid tip: Children may prefer plain steamed veggies with their roast, in which case adults can enjoy the leftover Brussels sprouts with toasted walnuts tomorrow, warmed in a lightly-oiled pan.
  • Dried shiitake mushrooms are available from Asian grocers and large supermarkets. If unavailable you can easily whip up traditional gravy instead. Ladle 2 cups of the cooking juices from the roasting pan into a small saucepan. Add a few tablespoons of the roasted onion and garlic slices and 2 tablespoons plain (all purpose) flour. Simmer gently for 10–15 minutes, stirring, until reduced and thickened. Season with salt and pepper. Puree in a blender until very smooth, and transfer to a small small warmed jug.

Kimchi coleslaw with daikon. One Equals Two.Blade beef, kimchi slaw and sriracha mayo Asian-style tacos. One Equals Two.

[Recipe 2] Asian-style tacos with blade beef, kimchi coleslaw and sriracha mayo

Ingredients (serves 4):
10 jian bing (Chinese pancakes)
♦ 2 cups (450g/1 lb) reserved roasted blade beef (+ ¼ cup pan juices), shredded, warmed
Sriracha mayo, to serve
Kimchi coleslaw (can make 1 day ahead):
½ wombok (Chinese/Napa cabbage), finely shredded (about 4 cups)
1 large carrot, grated (about 1 cup)
1 medium daikon (Chinese white radish), grated (about 1½ cups)
2 whole spring onions (scallions), thinly sliced
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon Gochugaru (Korean red chilli pepper flakes), or more (to taste)
⅓ cup (80ml) Japanese rice wine vinegar
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
½ teaspoon sea salt
Black sesame seeds, for sprinkling

Place wombok, carrot, daikon and spring onions in a large salad bowl. Mix sugar, gochugaru, vinegars and salt together and drizzle over. Toss well and scatter with black sesame seeds. Refrigerate until required.
Warm Chinese pancakes until just starting to bubble, in a lightly-oiled frying pan. Don’t overcook them, 1–2 minutes each side will suffice. Wrap in foil to keep warm.
To serve, spoon warmed reserved roasted blade beef and kimchi coleslaw onto each Chinese pancake. Drizzle with sriracha mayo and roll up to enclose. Enjoy!

  • Jian bing (very thin wheat-based Chinese pancakes) are available refrigerated in packets at Asian grocers, and are commonly used to wrap Peking duck. They’re usually prepared by lightly warming in a microwave, but I like gently frying them as the edges crisp nicely. Replace with small tortillas if unavailable.
  • Gochugaru (Korean red chilli pepper flakes) is available from Asian food stores. It is different to traditional chilli flakes, with more of a capsicum-ish flavour. Black sesame seeds and Japanese rice wine vinegar are available from large supermarkets and Asian food stores. 
  • You’ll need sriracha chili sauce for the sriracha mayo, which is available at Asian food stores and select supermarkets. Although commercially available at Woolworths, the authentic (and far superior!) version, made by Huy Fong Foods in California, is available in Australia from USA Foods.
  • Reserved shredded beef can be gently warmed in the microwave, covered with cling film. Drizzle with the reserved pan juices, cover with cling film (or a lid), and microwave on high for 1–2 minutes. Don’t make it too hot!
  • Kid tip: My 10-year old gobbles up these pancakes as is, but my 7 year old prefers tomato sauce (ketchup), grated carrot and sliced avocado in his.